Oklahoma Perinatal Quality Improvement Collaborative presents awards for efforts to improve outcomes for Oklahoma mothers and babies

Posted on: 10/8/14


Left to right are: Terry Cline, PhD, commissioner of health and secretary of health and human services; Christine Taylor, MD, obstetrician/gynecologist at Medical Center of Southeastern Oklahoma, Durant, recipient of the first Warren H. Crosby Champion for Maternal and Infant Health Award; and Chad Smith, MD, medical director of the Oklahoma Perinatal Quality Improvement Collaborative.

Sixteen Oklahoma hospitals recently received awards for their perinatal quality improvement efforts from the Oklahoma Perinatal Quality Improvement Collaborative. The awards were presented at the first annual summit of the collaborative in Midwest City. Approximately 200 providers of maternal and infant care came together at the event to discuss continued efforts to improve outcomes for Oklahoma mothers and babies, and to celebrate success from their ongoing work.  

In addition, Christine Taylor, MD, obstetrician/gynecologist at Medical Center of Southeastern Oklahoma, Durant, received the first Warren H. Crosby Champion for Maternal and Infant Health Award for going above and beyond to display exemplary effort to improve outcomes for mothers and babies in the local community and statewide.

Hospitals receiving “Dedication to Quality” awards were recognized for participation and sustained improvement in the areas of early elective deliveries (inducing labor and scheduling cesarean births before 39 weeks without a medical reason), education to prevent abusive head trauma (commonly known as shaken baby syndrome), and supporting women in breastfeeding. 

Hospitals receiving “Best Performance” awards were recognized for achieving and sustaining the lowest rate of early elective deliveries.

Terry Cline, PhD, commissioner of health and secretary of health and human services, welcomed the group and gave them the good news that Oklahoma’s infant mortality rate (number of infant deaths per 1,000 live births) dropped from 8.6 in 2007 to 6.8 in 2013, a decrease of 21 percent.

Dr. Cline congratulated the group saying, “Your efforts have made a significant contribution to this positive change. This improvement means that more babies will survive to be with their parents as they celebrate that first birthday. I am grateful for all of those working together to save lives, including the governor and the Legislature, which appropriated additional funding to reduce infant mortality.”  He went on to say that, “While we are excited to celebrate the lowest infant mortality rate in Oklahoma’s history, we still have much to do to reach the national average infant mortality rate of 6.1, and I hope once we reach the goal, we will strive to save even more babies.”

Receiving “Dedication to Quality” awards were:
Chickasaw Nation Medical Center, Ada
Comanche County Memorial Hospital, Lawton
Hillcrest Medical Center, Tulsa
INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center, Oklahoma City
INTEGRIS Bass Baptist Health Center, Enid
INTERIS Canadian Valley Hospital, Yukon
INTEGRIS Health Edmond
OU Medical Center Edmond Saint Francis Hospital, Tulsa
St. Anthony Hospital, Oklahoma City
St. Anthony Shawnee Hospital
Stillwater Medical Center
The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center, Oklahoma City
Woodward Regional Hospital

Receiving “Best Performance” awards were:
Jackson County Memorial Hospital, Altus
Northeastern Health System, Tahlequah

The Warren H. Crosby Award is named in honor of Dr. Warren Crosby, often called the “father of perinatal quality improvement” in Oklahoma.

Event participants were encouraged to continue this important work by implementing strategies that are known to affect outcomes within their own practices as well as contributing to the statewide efforts. The summit was funded by the March of Dimes and the Oklahoma State Department of Health. The Oklahoma Hospital Association is a partner in this collaborative.



OHA Partners with Healthcare Staffing Services 


Healthcare Staffing Services was developed as a collaborative effort among multiple state hospital associations to meet the temporary staffing needs of member hospitals and health systems.

Learn More »